The Experience

Escaping into the lush embrace of Panama’s Soberania National Park Rainforest sweeps you to a five-star sanctuary of privacy, luxury and solitude. You’ve arrived at Gamboa Rainforest Resort, one of the most unique resorts located directly on the Panama Canal.

Your experience begins with Gamboa Rainforest Resort’s unmatched amenities – an unparalleled collection of leisure pursuits designed to inspire every sense.164 beautifully designed rooms and suites with private balconies and hammocks. A meticulously landscaped pool and waterfall surrounded by designer chaise lounges. Exhilarating eco-tours and adventures, like zip lining, night safaris, kayaking across the Panama Canal and more. The Sensory Spa by Clarins at Gamboa Rainforest Resort, where you replenish the body and nourish the soul with an indulgent treatment. Exotic cuisine prepared by a renowned team of chefs.

Distinctive, enchanting and inspiring, Gamboa Rainforest Resort brings you Panama as it was meant to be discovered.

birdwatching

A veritable "Birders Heaven", Panama offers some of the best bird watching in the world and is home to nearly 1,000 species of birds in a small area of just 72,000 km2; smaller than South Carolina. Adding to the incredible number of birds, Panama has an impressive number of plants (10,000+), butterflies (16,000+), mammals (200+), frogs (190+) and many other surprises to discover. This is the perfect introduction to South and Central American birding. This beautiful and very accessible country offers a great diversity of neotropical bird species; many very difficult to find elsewhere. Excellent bird and animal watching locations can be easily accessed and a difficult and arduous hike is not necessary to find the animals. For more information visit:  www.birdingpanamagamboa.com

Embera Indigenous Village

Visit the Embera near the Gamboa Rainforest Resort.  The name "Embera" means "people."  Embera people live in small villages of 5 to 20 houses along the banks of the Chagres River. The villages are built on a small rise, set approximately 100 feet in from the river.

The houses of the village are set about 20– 50 feet apart atop the rise on posts, with no walls, but tall thatched roofs. Around each village, the jungle is partly cleared and replaced by banana and plantain plantations, a commercial crop for the Embera, who sell them to get cash for their outboard motors, mosquito nets, and the like. Their houses are raised off the ground about eight feet. The houses stand on large posts set in the ground, and have thatched roof made from palm fronds.

They paint their bodies with a dye made from Genipa americana, the berry of a species of genip tree. The black dye is thought to repel insects and the designs are known as jagua tattoos.